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The ABC of BBQ safety

3 August 2015

With the current warm weather and the summer holidays in full swing, you don’t have to go far to smell the distinctive aroma of the great British barbeque!

Whilst the safety messages surrounding barbeques often rightly centres on ensuring all meat and fish is thoroughly cooked, Humberside Fire and Rescue Service is asking people to take extra measures to reduce the fire risk during and after cooking.

The reminder comes after crews recently attended an incident that highlights how dangerous barbeques can be if not put out properly and disposed of safely. On this occasion, a disposable barbeque had not fully cooled before being placed in a bin at a bus stop in Bridlington. The coals set fire to rubbish in the bin which smouldered for some time giving off smoke before the Fire Service were called to extinguish the fire.

Community Safety Station Manager Steve Duffield warned people of the dangers:

“We want people to enjoy the good weather, but would urge them to be cautious and responsible when having a barbeque. Always use recognised fire lighters with charcoal and for gas fuelled barbeques, make sure it is cleaned regularly and in good condition.

Never use it near to garden furniture, sheds, fences or shrubs and make sure the coals are completely cool before disposing of them. People should also take care when using outdoor heaters and candles and never leave them unattended.

By following these simple tips, people can ensure they have an enjoyable barbeque whilst making sure everyone is safe”.

Barbecues

A barbecue should be a safe and enjoyable experience, but it’s all too easy to be distracted when you have friends and family around you whilst cooking. To avoid injuries or damage to property, follow these simple precautions:

General Safety

• Make sure your barbecue is in good working order.
• Ensure the barbecue is on a flat site, well away from a shed, trees or shrubs.
• Keep children, garden games and pets well away from the cooking area.
• Never leave the barbecue unattended.
• Keep a bucket of water or sand or a hosepipe nearby for emergencies.
• Ensure the barbecue is completely cooled before attempting to move it.

Charcoal Barbecues

• Use only enough charcoal to cover the base to a depth of about 50mm (2 inches).
• Only use recognised fire lighters or starter fuel and only on cold coals – use the minimum necessary and never use petrol.
• Never use barbeques indoors or in tents. The carbon monoxide given off can kill in minutes.
• Never put hot ashes straight into a dustbin or wheelie bin – they could melt the plastic and cause a fire.